TU Graz
Graz University of Technology

Advanced Materials Science

The Field-of-Expertise Advanced Materials Science is an interdisciplinary network of researchers at the TU Graz in chemistry, physics, architecture, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering and geodesy who discover, characterize and model materials, functional coatings and components. Thirty-three institutes from six faculties are presently involved.

Advanced Materials Day is the yearly meeting where the members of the FOE present their latest results. In 2019, the meeting will be held on September 26 at the Neue Technik campus in HS H "Ulrich Santner" in the Chemistry building.

 

Talks

: - :

Stefan Cesnik

: - :

Johannes Cartus

: - :

Andreas Jeindl

: - :

Fabio Calcinelli

: - :

Athanasopoulos Konstantinos

: - :

Mario Fratschko

: - :

Ann Maria James

: - :

Miltscho Andreev

: - :

Sumea Klokic

: - :

Kirill Keller

: - :

Taher Abu Ali

: - :

Josef Simbrunner / Roland Resel

06:00 - 06:00


06:00 - 06:00


06:00 - 06:00

Thomas Taucher

06:00 - 06:00

Yunus Seyrek

06:00 - 06:00

Christian Winkler, Institute of Solid State Physics

06:00 - 06:00

Kirill Keller

06:00 - 06:00

Thomas Taucher, Institute of Solid State Physics

06:10 - 06:15

Highly Integrated Ion-Traps for Quantum Computing
Michael Sieberer and Alex Zesar
https://cloud.sieberer.me/f/31f0d2fcd30b4ae39350/?dl=1

Abstract:

While not a new concept anymore, quantum computing is currently being pushed by numerous global players to speed up several currently intractable computer calculations, most notably in quantum chemistry and data security. Trapped-ion quantum bits (qubits) are, among others, a promising candidate for future quantum computers. These use the quantized energy levels of the valence electron to encode quantum information.
Infineon currently develops a microfabricated ion trap [arXiv:2003.08085] that confines ions in 18 different trapping sites by providing appropriate RF- and DC-fields that precisely position the ions several microns above the trap's surface. It is possible to move the ions by varying the DC-fields, which allows the quantum computer to move and store the qubits in registers physically. This physical movement is necessary since the no-cloning-theorem prohibits copying a quantum state, and quantum teleportation is expensive and introduces errors.

A future quantum computer will require thousands of physical qubits to function correctly. As part of the PIEDMONS (https://www.piedmons.eu) project, we address two obstacles that currently prevent scaling-up the trapped-ion platform. Like most quantum computers, trapped ions require cryogenic temperatures to keep their quantum state. However, increasing the trap size to accommodate that many qubits will lead to significant heat dissipation due to wire resistance and dielectric losses. Thus, Alexander will characterize the oxide in the operating-frequency range (about 30MHz) and improve its quality to reduce dielectric losses. Secondly, he will investigate breakdown mechanisms between electrodes. The final target is an improved trap design that tolerates higher voltages and offers reduced losses and higher ion density.
The second obstacle is that feeding many different DC voltages to the trap is difficult due to the long signal path from outside the trap's cryogenic environment. Michael's task is to develop an integrated circuit (IC) that can operate in the cryogenic regime and thus very close to the trap. If this succeeds, it is possible to move many qubit-ions simultaneously by changing the right DC voltages. As stated, this would allow register-move operations, similar to the ones in a classical CPU. The main challenges here are the ion's high noise-sensitivity, the cryogenic temperatures, and the limits on power dissipation.
In our presentation, we want to address the difficulties that we already faced and discuss possible solutions.

 

Posters 15:30 - 17:30

Advanced Materials Day Online
Horst Bischof, Anna Maria Coclite, Gregor Trimmel, Christof Sommitsch

1 posters.